Looking back at nearly five years of Curious Incident

The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night Time

After nearly 1,500 performances, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is nearing its end in London. Mark Ludmon looks back over its five-year run. Nearly five years – or 1,743 days – after Christopher Boone first set out to investigate The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the National Theatre, the show continues to earn standing ovations at its current home of the Gielgud. Audiences are wowed by Bunny Christie’s design, Finn Ross’s video effects, Steven Hoggett and Scott Graham’s movement direction, Simon Stephens’s writing, Mark Haddon’s story and, of course, the talent and physical prowess required to play the lead role of Christopher. After nearly 1,500 performances, the show will end its run in London on June 3. In that time, it will have been seen by over 1 million people in London, with Christopher played by 18 different actors including understudies. With many … Read more

REVIEW: Things I Know To Be True, Lyric Hammersmith ✭✭✭✭✭

Frantic Assembly Things i Know To be True

Families are complicated and messy, nevertheless, family dramas when captured correctly can be hugely touching. No matter what our background, we all have emotive views about ‘family’, and those connections usually run deep. Brookman and Graham have made Bovell’s already vital story come to life in such a way that the actors’ performances truly soar. I defy you not to be moved. This, in short, is a blistering production with universal appeal. All I can say is; go! You will not be disappointed.

REVIEW: Grand Hotel, Southwark Playhouse ✭✭✭

Grand Hotel at Southwark Playhouse

Proud’s choreography is redolent with an acute understanding of all this and everything he does aims to help involvement in and understanding of the work’s intent. The hotel is seen as reflective of the Berlin experience and that is reflective of world experience: the microcosm in the hotel provides universal truths and observations. From the almost military opening routine, through the set pieces and the smaller incidents, the big, joyous all-in numbers, and the more intimate moments of pain or joy, Proud sees to it that dance propels the action, accentuates the fun and underscores the darkness.

Frantic Assembly Present Othello at Lyric Hammersmith

Kirsty Oswald and Mark Ebulue in Frantic Assembly's Othello. Photo: Manuel Harlan

Frantic Assembly’s acclaimed and award-winning Othello  will explode onto the stage of London’s Lyric Hammersmith following its UK tour. Set against the backdrop of Yorkshire during the race riots of 2001, Artistic Director Scott Graham has bought a fresh take to Shakespeare’s timeless story of paranoia, jealousy, sex and murder. Fusing a taut adaptation of the classic text with its trademark hard-hitting choreography, Frantic Assembly takes a scalpel to 21st century Britain, exposing prejudice, danger and fear. The Yorkshire race riots of 2001 were a time of terrible divisions and some unexpected alliances. Othello’s passionate affair with Desdemona leaves him open to jealousy and attack – with devastating consequences. Violence is a way of life and reputation is everything… Mark Ebulue, recently of the RSC and a former kickboxer, plays Othello. Steven Miller, known for his four-year stint as Lenny Lyons in Casualty (BBC TV) plays Iago, with Kirsty Oswald … Read more

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