Further Cast Announced For King Lear At The Old Vic – Book Now

Book now for King Lear at the Old Vic starring Glenda Jackson

Further casting has been announced for King Lear at the Old Vic which will be presented from 25 October to 3 December 2016. One of the most anticipated theatrical events of the year sees double Academy Award-winning actor Glenda Jackson return to the stage in the role of King Lear. She will be joined by Celia Imrie as Goneril, Morfydd Clark as Cordelia, William Chubb as Albany, Jane Horrocks as Regan, Rhys Ifans as The Fool, Simon Manyonda as Edmond, and Harry Melling as Edgar. King Lear is directed by Deborah Warner. BOOK NOW FOR KING LEAR AT THE OLD VIC THEATRE

Lawrence After Arabia at Hampstead Theatre

Book Now for Lawrence After Arabia at Hampstead Theatre

Hampstead Theatre will present Lawrence After Arabia from 28 April – 4 June 2016. Commissioned to mark the centenary of the Arab revolt, this new play by Howard Brenton will be directed by John Dove. August, 1922. The most famous man in England has vanished without a trace: T.E. Lawrence has completely disappeared. But in the idyllic calm of the village of Ayot St Lawrence, on the top floor of the home of Mr and Mrs Bernard Shaw, the ‘uncrowned King of Arabia’ is hiding – with slabs of homemade carrot cake for comfort. Wearied by his romanticised persona and worldwide fame, disgusted with his country and himself, Lawrence is craving normality. But when you’re a brilliant archaeologist, scholar, linguist, writer and diplomat – as well as a legendary desert warrior – how can you ever be normal? And beyond the Shaws’ garden wall, nobody cares how he feels: England … Read more

REVIEW: Richard II, Shakespeare’s Globe ✭✭✭✭

Richard II at Shakespeare's Globe

The result here is that this is more the Comedy of Richard II than the Tragedy of Richard II. There is an unseemly pursuit of laughter – characterisations are extreme, language is tossed aside in favour of quick laughs and the deeper, darker side of text and situation is left largely unconsidered. This is not to say that production is not entertaining – it is – but it is not a production which seeks to achieve anything in particular or which attempts to enliven or illuminate. In rather the same way as an accomplished school performance can leave you satisfied, so too does this production. It’s a great introductory point; if this is your first taste of Shakespeare, you won’t be disappointed. But if you come looking for insight or new perspectives, you will find none.

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