New version of Blondel The Musical comes to Union Theatre

Blondel the musical is to be staged at the Union Theatre in June 2017.

Musical theatre fans spread the word throughout the kingdom that a brand new version of the musical comedy by Tim Rice and Stephen Oliver is to be staged at the Union Theatre from 21 June – 15 July 2017. Heralds have been trumpeting the news this afternoon that the musical has been re-worked with book is by Tim Rice and Tom Williams, and additional music by Mathew Pritchard. Blondel is the tale of an ambitious minstrel in the court of King Richard the Lionheart and follows his trials and tribulations as he seeks to save his King and write the perfect love song to dedicate to his beloved Fiona. Tim Rice said today: “I’m delighted Blondel is returning to the stage. It was one of the most enjoyable projects of my career, and I’ve always felt Stephen Oliver’s wonderful music deserved a larger audience than it reached back in 1983 … Read more

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Sasha Regan's All Male Pirates Of Penzance

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Whistle Down The Wind At The Union Theatre

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Love Story musical Union Theatre

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