Full Casting Announced For The Wild Party at The Other Palace

Frances Ruffelle to star as Queenie in The Wild Party at The Other Palace

Full casting has been announced for Michael John LaChiusa’s The Wild Party, which will receive its London premiere at The Other Palace (formerly the St James Theatre) on 13 February 2017. Tickets are now on sale. Joining the previously announced Frances Ruffelle as Queenie are John Owen-Jones (Les Miserables, The Phantom Of The Opera) as Burrs, Simon Thomas (Phantom Of The Opera, Legally Blonde) as Black, Donna McKechnie (A Chorus Line, Promises, Promises) as Dolores, Dex Lee (Grease, In The Heights) as Jackie, Victoria Hamilton-Barritt (Murder Ballad, In The Heights) as Kate, Ako Mitchell (Ragtime, Grey Gardens) as Eddie, Gloria Obianyo and Genesis Lynea as The D’armano Bros, Melanie Bright as Sally, Lizzy Connolly as Mae, Steven Serlin as Goldberg, Sebastian Torkia as Gold, Bronté Barbé as Nadine and Tiffany Graves as Madelaine. Set against a backdrop of Manhattan decadence and 1920’s excess, The Wild Party tells the story of … Read more

Frances Ruffelle To Star in The Wild Party At The Other Palace

Frances Ruffelle to star as Queenie in The Wild Party at The Other Palace

Frances Ruffelle is to play Queenie in The Wild Party, when it receives it’s first major UK production at The Other Palace from 11 February 2017. Tickets are now on sale. Set against a backdrop of Manhattan decadence and 1920’s excess, The Wild Party tells the story of Queenie and Burrs, a Vaudeville showgirl and a Vaudeville clown whose relationship is marked by vicious behaviour and recklessness. In an attempt to salvage their toxic union, they decide to throw a party to end all parties. The guests are a vivid collection of the unruly and the undone: a cocaine-sniffing bisexual playboy; a washed-up boxer; a diva of indeterminate age; a fresh-faced ingénue; and a handsome Valentino who catches Queenie’s roving eye. The jazz and gin-soaked party rages to a mounting sense of threat, as artifice and illusion are stripped away. But when midnight debauchery turns into tragedy, the revellers must … Read more

REVIEW: First Daughter Suite, Anspacher Theatre, The Public ✭✭✭✭✭

First Daughter Suite at the Public Theatre

It would be unsurprising if First Daughter Suite constituted a significant hat-trick for the Public, following, as it does, in the footsteps of Fun Home (which won the Tony Award for Best Musical) and Hamilton (which surely will win that Tony Award this year). It is a mature, sophisticated, joyful and challenging musical work, hilarious and heart-breaking in equal measure. It’s a triumph, unquestionably.

REVIEW: See What I Wanna See, Jermyn Street Theatre ✭✭✭

See What I Wanna See at Jermyn Street Theatre

Marc Elliott is the one cast member who seems to understand this and he completely subsumed himself in his dual roles of Thief and Reporter. Sinewy, handsome, bristling with electric sensuality in the first act, Elliott is superb. In some ways, his more complex turn as the lost Reporter, a vain, pretty and confused modern man is the superior performance. Both, though, are clever, thoughtful turns, and Elliott’s voice is equal to the demands of the score. He is proving to be a serious player in the field of musical theatre in London.

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