Harry Potter Lead Casting Announced

Harry Potter And The Cursed Child cast

The producers of Harry Potter And The Cursed Child have announced that Jamie Parker, Noma Dumezweni and Paul Thornley will take on the roles of Harry, Hermoine and Ron respectively. J.K. Rowling said: “I’m so excited with the choice of casting for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. I can’t wait to see Jamie, Noma and Paul bring the adult Harry, Hermione and Ron to life on stage next summer.” Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is one play presented in two parts. Both parts are intended to be seen in order on the same day (matinee and evening), or on two consecutive evenings. Previews begin 7 June 2016 with the Opening performances of Part One and Part Two on Saturday 30 July 2016. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is currently booking to 27 May 2017. Find Out More About Harry Potter And The Cursed Child

Full Casting Announced For Guys And Dolls

Guys and Dolls Uk Tour 2015

Full casting has now been confirmed for the acclaimed Chichester Festival Theatre revival of Guys and Dolls which will tour nationally and play at London’s Savoy Theatre in December 2015. Joining Sophie Thompson as Miss Adelaide and Jamie Parker as Sky Masterson, are David Haig as Nathan Detroit and Siubhan Harrison as Sarah Brown. Completing the cast are Lucy Jane Adcock, Abigail Brodie, Cornelius Clarke, Momar Diagne, Lavinia Fitzpatrick, Lorna Gale, Nic Greenshields, Selina Hamilton, Ian Hughes, Frankie Jenna, Jacob Maynard, Neil McCaul, Genevieve Nicole, William Oxborrow, Max Parker, Carl Patrick, James Revell, Giovanni Spano, Gavin Spokes, Jonathan Stewart, Lucie Mae Sumner and Liam Wrate. For further tour details and to purchase tickets visit our Guys and Dolls Tour Page

Guys and Dolls UK Tour Tickets 2015

Guys and Dolls UK Tour

“You would be silly to miss seeing their wonderful, world class performances” Stephen Collins – BritishTheatre.com Following its sell-out, highly acclaimed run at the Chichester Festival Theatre, Guys and Dolls will undertake a UK tour and a limited engagement and London’s Savoy Theatre. Guys and Dolls follows Chichester’s recent transfers of classic musicals including Singin’ In The Rain, The Pajama Game and most recently Gypsy. Nathan Detroit is desperate: he needs money for an illegal dice game, and he needs it fast. Not to mention a 14-year engagement with nightclub singer Miss Adelaide (Sophie Thompson), whose patience is finally running out. Enter notorious gambler Sky Masterson (Jamie Parker), a guy who can never turn down a bet, and straight-laced missionary Sarah Brown, a doll with a heart of ice. Nathan’s wager is that Sky has to romance Sarah by taking her to Havana for dinner and in return he’ll provide … Read more

REVIEW: High Society, Old Vic Theatre ✭✭✭

High Society at the Old Vic Theatre

The first fifteen minutes or so of Act Two are as good as, if not the equal of, any fifteen minutes of any musical currently playing on the West End (the final fifteen minutes of both of Gypsy’s acts excluded). In the main, this is down to three things: superb orchestrations (Chris Walker), fantastic musicianship (Theo Jamieson, Joe Stilgoe and a red hot band) and inspired, creative choreography (Nathan M Wright). Together, these three magical elements work musical theatre alchemy, and the cast go along with it infectiously, without restraint.

REVIEW: A Little Night Music Concert, Palace Theatre ✭✭✭✭

A Little Night Music 40th Anniversary Concert at the Palace Theatre, London

Wheeler’s dialogue sparkled and fizzed, even in the mouths of those who were oddly or badly miscast. The sense of the quality of the literary glories of the book was most clear in the case of Joanna Riding’s faultless Countess. Every line was a winner. In the hands of Anna O’Byrne, Anne Ergerman was a complete triumph, the glittering centrepiece of Act One.

REVIEW: Assassins, Menier Chocolate Factory ✭✭✭✭✭

Assassins at the Menier Chocolate Factory starring Aaron Tveit

What is most impressive about Lloyd’s Assassins is the way it can walk the line between tragedy and farce, between opera and vaudeville, with integrity and precision. Chris Bailey’s quite wonderful choreography makes you feel exuberant and queasy at the same time. More than anything else, the emphasis here is on putting the Musical into Assassins.

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