James Graham’s Ink transfers to West End

Ink at Almeida Theatre

The critically acclaimed Ink, which has just played a sell-out season at the Almeida will transfer to the Duke Of York’s Theatre from 9 September – 6 January 2018. James Graham’s play centres around Fleet Street and the offices of The Sun in 1969. A rebellious, young Rupert Murdoch asks The Sun’s Editor the impossible – to give the people what they want. No matter the cost! Directed by Rupert Goold (King Charles III). Ink will star Bertie Carvel (Doctor Foster, Matilda) and Richard Coyle  (The Associate, The Lover) reprising their roles from the Almeida Season. James Graham said: “It’s been such a creatively rewarding experience, building this show at the Almeida. I’m in absolute awe of our actors and the creative team, led by Rupert. And grateful to the audiences who’ve been coming and supporting the work. After being given the chance to revive This House in the West … Read more

Carvel And Coyle Cast In Almeida’s Ink

Bertie Carvell and Richard Coyle to star in Ink at Aleida Theatre

Bertie Carvel and Richard Coyle are to lead the cast of James Graham’s new play about The Sun newspaper at the Almeida Theatre. Carvel will play a “young and rebellious” Rupert Murdoch who bought the struggling tabloid in 1969 and relaunched it as the populist publication it is today. Coyle will play Larry Lamb who took over as Murdoch’s first editor with a quest, against all odds, to give the people what they want. Joining them will be Pearl Chanda, with further casting to be announced soon. It is being designed by Bunny Christie with lighting by Neil Austin and sound and composition by Adam Cork. Ink will be directed by the Almeida’s artistic director Rupert Goold and run from June 17 to August 5. In his debut at the Almeida, Graham is again exploring modern society and politics as in previous acclaimed plays including This House, The Vote, Privacy … Read more

REVIEW: The Hairy Ape, Old Vic Theatre ✭✭✭✭✭

Bertie Carvell in The Hairy Ape at the Old Vic. Photo: Manuel Harlan

O’Neill’s play has lost none of its power or resonance. It still feels as shocking and new today as no doubt it did in 1922. Jones’ revelatory and evocative production is not just beautiful to look at, easy to follow and enthralling – it also reminds that the questions of oppression, disparity and injustice which concerned O’Neill then are still pertinent. The world may not turn to the tune of industrialists quite so much in the 21st Century, but there is still a clear, powerful and rich elite and workers whose lives are made hideous while the rich get richer.

REVIEW: Bakkhai, Almeida Theatre ✭✭✭✭✭

The bakkhai at the Almeida Theatre

This is Whishaw’s show – no question. He is a force of nature, fiercely unearthing every moment of nuance, humour and purpose from the text and giving a totally committed, undeniably powerful and persuasive performance. Every moment is fascinating, thought through and skilfully played. Dionysius was the God of the theatre, as well as wine, song and dance. Whishaw makes this part of the very fabric of his turn as the vengeful God, and offsets that performance with two remarkable cameos – as Tieresias and the Messenger. He is magical in every way.

Send this to a friend