Cast Announced For Gate’s The Christians

The Christians by Lucas Hnath plays the Gate Theatre and the Traverse Theatre as part of the Edinburgh Festival

Casting has been announced for the UK Premiere of The Christians by Lucas Hnath which forms part of the Gate’s Icons and Idols Season. The company of The Christians includes William Gaminara (Pastor), Jaye Griffiths (Pastor’s Wife), Stefan Adegbola (Associate Pastor), Lucy Ellinson (Congregant) and David Calvitto (Elder). For the last twenty years, Pastor Paul has been building his church. Starting in a modest storefront, he now presides over a flock of thousands. Idolised by his followers, today should be a day for joy and celebration. But the sermon that Paul is about to preach will shake the very foundations of his followers’ beliefs. As fractures spread throughout his congregation, Paul must fight to prevent his church from tearing itself apart. This is the UK première of Lucas Hnath’s remarkable exploration of faith and community in the modern world. Featuring a full-scale community choir, it asks profound questions about what … Read more

Clwyd Theatr Cymru Appoints Tamara Harvey as Artistic Director

Tamara Harvey joins Vlwyd Theatr Cymru as Artistic Director

It was announced today that Tamara Harvey has been appointed the new Artistic Director of Clwyd Theatr Cymru from August 2015. She becomes the sixth Artistic Director in the theatre’s thirty-nine year history. On her appointment Tamara Harvey said: “I am thrilled to have been invited to be the artistic director of Clwyd Theatr Cymru at such an exciting moment in its history. Terry Hands has done an extraordinary job in building a family of artists and producing brilliant work for a growing loyal audience. Now, as the company moves into its fortieth year, I look forward to widening that circle: nurturing talent from Wales and beyond, and collaborating with companies and artists both near and far to ensure that this beacon of innovation on top of a hill in Mold is an inspiration for Wales, the UK and the rest of the world.” Tamara Harvey has directed in the … Read more

REVIEW: Death Of A Salesman, Royal Shakespeare Theatre ✭✭✭

Death Of A Salesman by Arthur Miller at the Royal Shakespeare Company

The role of Willy Loman is very exacting, requiring great range and subtlety from the actor. The single greatest requirement, though, is for the actor to be Loman rather than to play him; there needs to be total immersion in the character, and the character’s different stages. It must be possible to see the Loman who so enthralled and impressed his sons, the Loman who believed in the Dream and to contrast that against the Loman who is engulfed, diminished, destroyed. Antony Sher gives a prickly, vigorous, erratically explosive performance. He might wear Loman’s skin but he never gets under it.

REVIEW: Love’s Sacrifice, The Swan Theatre ✭✭

Love's Sacrifice at the Swan Theatre

Despite a delicious design from Anna Fleischle (the black velvet floor and beautifully detailed costumes especially) and some winning, often charming, performances from Catrin Stewart, Jamie Thomas King, Andy Apollo, Colin Ryan and Matthew Needham, Dunster’s production does not establish any case for Love’s Sacrifice to be revived.

REVIEW: Love’s Labour’s Won, Royal Shakespeare Theatre ✭✭✭✭

The RSC production of Love's Labour's Won at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre

Christopher Luscombe’s very funny version of the Beatrice/Benedick show complete with magnificent, period set (Simon Highlett), some fabulous costumes, Nigel Hess’ delightful music and Jenny Arnold’s joyful movement. Setting the play in the post-World War 1 period works nicely; the sense of changing times is entirely appropriate. It’s a gentle but frisky time and you can almost hear the approach of the flappers.

REVIEW: The Shoemaker’s Holiday, Swan Theatre ✭✭✭✭

The Company of The Shoemaker's Holiday at the RSC

Breen squeezes every bit of comedic possibility from the play. The repertory company, so good in the dramatic and enthralling Oppenheimer, prove to be equally skilled in the bawdy comedy department. There are sly asides, vicious insults, dirty double entendres, rowdy gags, silly accent routines, fart jokes, catch-phrase jollity, physical comedy, costume comedy, sight gags, clowning – you name it, it can be found in Breen’s lucid, fast-moving and hugely enjoyable production.

REVIEW:Merit, The Drum – Plymouth ✭✭✭

Rebecca Lacey and Lizzy Watts in Merit at The Drum theatre in Plymouth

Merit has a timeless quality, examining themes relevant to any society going through economic upheaval. It also explores broader ideas such as our responsibilities towards others when money is short: Patricia questions Sofia’s decision to give to charity when people are losing their homes just as many people question whether countries in recession should continue to give aid to the developing world.

REVIEW: Oppenheimer, Swan Theatre ✭✭✭✭✭

The RSC presents Oppenheimer at the Swan Theatre

Morton-Smith has written a masterpiece which Angus Jackson has cast and directed in a way which gives it full measure, lustre and power. No one here gives anything other than a first-class performance. John Heffernan, in the central role, with the bulk of the play squarely on his shoulders, is world class. He is magical, mercurial, magnificent.

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